Control “Out of Gamut” Colours & Soft Proofing Images for Print

Printing Basics, Soft Proofing and "Out of Gamut" Colours Both your eyes and your computer monitor can see millions of different colours, and while modern high end printers can print an impressive range of colours, they are more limited in what colours they can print compared to what you can see on your monitor. These colours that cannot be printed are called "out of gamut colours" and are outside the range of colours that the printer is capable of reproducing. I had written and made a video about "How to Retain Highlight and…Read more …

How to Retain Highlight and Shadow Details for Print.

How to Use the Targeted Adjustment Tool on the Curves Adjustment Layer, to Get the Widest Tonal Range for Your Prints When you are editing your photographs to be viewed on your computer or to be uploaded onto a server to be see by the world on various devices that have access the internet, from desktop to hand-held then highlight and shadow detail while important is not exactly crucial. Often simply auto-adjusting brightness/exposure is usually good enough for viewing images on a computer monitor, especially since you should upload images optimized for websites…Read more …

Adding Grain to Digital Photographs

Simulate Film Grain in Your Digital Photographs. I think what I miss most about film when I am working on a digital photograph is the texture that film grain adds to the photograph. It is something that gives a photograph a unique feel and added depth, and in some cases created a mystery or a dream like quality to a photographic image. Sure, many digital cameras at a higher ISO create noise, but noise rarely looks good and it is something that the majority of photographers want to avoid. Most types of noise…Read more …

Reducing Haze from Landscape Photographs

Reducing Haze using a “Selective Colour” adjustment layer. When photographing landscapes, atmospheric haze can be quite problematic, especially when photographing very grand, open landscapes with mountains and/or large bodies of water. Depending on your subject matter, even on the clearest of days haze can still be present, and it may lessen the quality of your photograph. Haze only really effects the objects in the distance, but it can have a over all softening effect on photographs, even when you use a smaller aperture on you lens in order to create more depth in…Read more …

Straighten Horizon Line

Three easy methods for straightening your photographs. It is very easy to end up with a crooked photograph, especially when you are shooting hand-held. Even the most seasoned pro photographers make photographs that need to be straightened, usually this is because you are so focused on the subject, trying to a capture a moment that the background becomes a lesser priority and you end up with a photograph that is a little wonky. The image itself may be stunning, but needs a little correction in order for the horizon line of the background…Read more …

How to Photograph People using Direct Sunlight

How to use direct sunlight to make your portrait photographs beautiful. Ambient light, studio light, available light and the most important light of all, star light. That gigantic mass of hydrogen and helium we call the sun that produces 386 billion billion ( not a typo ) mega-Watts of energy, that is created by so many nuclear fusion reactions per second that we don't have a number big enough to count them all, which is awesome when you want to use a really low ISO setting on your digital camera. Using direct sunlight…Read more …

Ambient High-key Beauty Lighting

How to do ambient high-key beauty lighting using only one light source. The most beautiful light is often the simplest, coming only from a single light source. In this beauty photograph of Emma that light source was a large bay window that was behind her, and the light was simple indirect ambient sunlight being channelled though the window. Ambient high-key beauty lighting is quite easy to do in a close-up beauty photograph like this, or for a portrait photograph. The most beautiful light is often the simplest, coming only from a single light…Read more …

Selective Sharpening

Selective sharpening for print output. Sharpening photographs for prints is more subtle practice than sharpening JPEG or PNG files for the world wide web. Only certain areas of a photograph may require sharpening. A portrait or beauty photograph will most likely need selective sharpening, perhaps on the mouth, nose, cheek bones, hair, or eyebrows, and most importantly the eyes. You may want to sharpen around the eyes, like the upper and lower eyelids and the eyebrows, but want it to be less sharp than the iris and pupils. Both eyes may need to be…Read more …

Vignetting

Vignetting Photographs for Artistic Effect. Vignetting to put it simply is the darkening of the outside edges of a photograph. In photography there are many types of vignetting, mechanical vignetting, optical vignetting, natural vignetting, pixel vignetting and finally vignetting for artistic effect. All the different types of vignetting ( excluding vignetting for artistic effect ) are not considered desirable and are caused by objects on the lens ( mechanical ),  in the lens ( optical ), by light fall off ( natural ), or in the case of pixel vignetting this can happen…Read more …

Understanding Histograms

How to Use Histograms Introduction Probably the most useful as well as the least used and understood tool in your digital camera is the histogram. Histograms are the reason why I don't have to bring my light-meter with me anymore when I am out photographing landscapes ( I will always use a light-meter when photographing people). A histogram is a visual graphic representation tool that analyses the exposure range in the photograph you just made. Unlike a light-meter which measures light before the exposure, the histogram analyses the image after the exposure. Thinking…Read more …